Book 6

6.28
In-the-past [proteron] as well [as now, in the present time of Thrasyboulos], there was a man, Antilokhos, a man of violent-strength [biā],
6.29
who won as his prize this mind [noēma].
6.30
He died for his father, standing up to the man-killer,
6.31
the war-lord of the Aethiopians,
6.32
Memnon. Blocking Nestor’s chariot was the horse struck down by the arrows
6.33
of Paris, while he [= Memnon] was attacking
6.34
with his powerful spear.
6.35
The old man from Messene [= Nestor],
6.36
was stung in his mind [phrēn], and he shouted for his son.
6.37
The wording that shot out from him did not fall, useless, to the ground.
6.38
This godlike man [= Antilokhos] made his stand, right there,
6.39
and he paid the price of death for the rescue [komidē] of his father.
6.40
He had a glory, it had been shown to that generation of long ago,
6.41
once he accomplished a deed so enormous also for younger generations to see—a glory that made him manifestly
6.42
the foremost when it comes to an achievement [aretē] regarding parents.
6.43
But those things are in the past.
6.44
As for the present, Thrasyboulos
6.45
stands up to the standard of-the-ancestors [= adjective patrōio-] better than anyone else.
6.46
He has clearly measured up to his father’s brother [= Theron of Akragas] in every manner of excellence.
6.47
By way of his thinking [nóos] does he bring wealth [ploutos],
6.48
reaping the benefits of a youth [hēbē] that is neither without-justice [dīkē] nor overweening.
6.49
Rather he reaps a skill [sophiā] to be found in the recesses of Pieria [= the abode of the Muses].
6.50
O Earth-Shaking Poseidon, you who rule over the racings of horses, he [= Thrasyboulos] is close to you with a mind [nóos] that is very pleasing to you, he stays close to you.